Our Impact

We fight for the self-sufficiency of every low-income New Yorker by taking on the toughest challenges and creating new solutions to old problems. We win by helping families shift from surviving to thriving. Take a look at our impact in 2017.

ReadNYC

ReadNYC is United Way of New York City’s signature collective impact program that is helping low-income families as a whole move from surviving to thriving. The program is built on UWNYC’s belief that getting a solid, quality education as a child is key to becoming a self-sufficient adult and caregiver. And for a child to get this type of education, they need strong schools, teachers, principals, parents, and neighborhoods. To empower children and communities, ReadNYC brings together corporations, government, philanthropy, and individuals to set and implement a comprehensive strategy that’s improving literacy rates and stabilizing homes.

THE RESULTS

  • ReadNYC empowered more than 800 students, 227 parents, 55 teachers, and 12 principals during the 2016–2017 school year and summer.
  • ReadNYC provided more than 3 hours of additional learning time per day to more than 600 K–2nd grade students.
  • Nearly 230 Mott Haven parents made progress toward self-sufficiency through financial empowerment and community referral programs.
  • More than 190 students received free dental screenings and cleanings, because a child with dental problems can’t concentrate on school or homework.

English Language Arts (ELA) Results for Mott Haven ReadNYC Schools

Across our six ReadNYC schools in Mott Haven, in the South Bronx, we saw a 12.6% increase in 3rd grade ELA proficiency rates.

ReadNYC Chart

Our coaching work, which began in the 2014–15 school year, has positively impacted this student achievement growth and improved teacher and school leadership capacity. Our work has supported the school leaders’ focus on the achievement gap and on strengthening their instructional leadership skills.

Of importance, we have worked with school leaders and their teacher leadership teams to define equity, to define and implement a solution to an equity challenge, and to focus on improving rigor in classroom teaching and learning practices through participation in professional learning communities.

 

*In 2016, the NY State Education Department changed the testing experience and manner of the assessments for the ELA exam.

EducationNYC

EducateNYC is United Way of New York City’s community schools initiative, offering the supports and services needed to remove barriers and help students succeed.

In 2017, more than 20,000 students at 45 Attendance Improvement and Dropout Prevention (AIDP) initiative schools were served. EducateNYC works with the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) and the NYCDOE Office of Community Schools to strengthen school and community-based organization (CBO) partnerships. These partnerships allow EducateNYC to provide increased attention to attendance improvement and implement an array of student and family services.

THE RESULTS

  • UWNYC community partners provided more than 27,000 services—including after school, physical and mental health, art and culture, and youth development—across 45 AIDP schools.
  • Nearly 6,000 students were engaged in Expanded Day Learning—keeping them learning beyond the normal school day to continue their academic success.
  • More than 9,000 students received health and mental health services—ensuring they have the supports needed to advance their education.
  • EducateNYC served more than 20,000 elementary, middle, and high school students and their families during the 2016–2017 academic year.
FeedNYC

FeedNYC works to strengthen the capacity of emergency food providers to distribute healthy, fresh food to underserved neighborhoods across New York City. FeedNYC addresses the nearly 3 million New Yorkers who regularly have trouble affording healthy food and the 1.4 million New Yorkers who don’t know where their next meal will come from.

THE RESULTS

Through our partnership with 400 community-based organizations, our FeedNYC team:

  • Distributed nearly $7 million in food support grants to more than 360 emergency food providers.
  • Served 3.4 million meals across 360 emergency food providers.
  • Distributed nearly 300,000 pounds of fresh, local produce to 48 emergency food providers.
  • Conducted 15 nutrition, hands-on cooking, and food safety workshops.
  • Awarded $30,000 through our Seed Grant for urban farming program, which improves emergency food providers’ access to fresh, healthy foods.
BenefitsAccessNYC

BenefitsAccessNYC connects families with critical assistance essential to becoming self-sufficient, including benefits such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), emergency food and shelter, healthcare assistance, transportation support, financial empowerment, and job-readiness opportunities to help New Yorkers move from surviving to thriving.

THE RESULTS

Through partnerships with nine community organizations, our BenefitsAccessNYC team:

  • Provided outreach to nearly 62,000 households to inform them of benefits to which they may be entitled*.
  • Filed more than 16,000 applications and enrolled nearly 11,000 households in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)*.
  • Referred more than 13,000 households in a range of public benefits*.
  • Supported more than 20 agencies, providing financial assistance to families and helped more than 2,500 NYC families, receive emergency cash assistance to prevent eviction and loss of essential utility services**.

*Numbers for UWNYC’s Food Support Connections Program reflect the budget year of October 1, 2016–September 30, 2017.
**Numbers reflect UWNYC’s Emergency Food and Shelter Program Phase 33 running February 1, 2017–January 31, 2018, and Phase 34 that began October 1, 2017 and ends January 31, 2018.

BoardServeNYC

BoardServeNYC connects nonprofit partners with talented and committed individuals who are eager to share their skills and expertise as board members. BoardServeNYC helps volunteers strengthen their leadership skills, impact positive change in high-need communities, and expand both their professional and personal networks.

THE RESULTS

  • 139 people were accepted into the BoardServeNYC program
  • 117 BoardServeNYC candidates received training
  • 49 board members, including executive directors, received customized coaching
  • 19 newly trained board members were placed
  • 21 nonprofit boards trained in good governance
All

ReadNYC

ReadNYC is United Way of New York City’s signature collective impact program that is helping low-income families as a whole move from surviving to thriving. The program is built on UWNYC’s belief that getting a solid, quality education as a child is key to becoming a self-sufficient adult and caregiver. And for a child to get this type of education, they need strong schools, teachers, principals, parents, and neighborhoods. To empower children and communities, ReadNYC brings together corporations, government, philanthropy, and individuals to set and implement a comprehensive strategy that’s improving literacy rates and stabilizing homes.

THE RESULTS

  • ReadNYC empowered more than 800 students, 227 parents, 55 teachers, and 12 principals during the 2016–2017 school year and summer.
  • ReadNYC provided more than 3 hours of additional learning time per day to more than 600 K–2nd grade students.
  • Nearly 230 Mott Haven parents made progress toward self-sufficiency through financial empowerment and community referral programs.
  • More than 190 students received free dental screenings and cleanings, because a child with dental problems can’t concentrate on school or homework.

English Language Arts (ELA) Results for Mott Haven ReadNYC Schools

Across our six ReadNYC schools in Mott Haven, in the South Bronx, we saw a 12.6% increase in 3rd grade ELA proficiency rates.

ReadNYC Chart

Our coaching work, which began in the 2014–15 school year, has positively impacted this student achievement growth and improved teacher and school leadership capacity. Our work has supported the school leaders’ focus on the achievement gap and on strengthening their instructional leadership skills.

Of importance, we have worked with school leaders and their teacher leadership teams to define equity, to define and implement a solution to an equity challenge, and to focus on improving rigor in classroom teaching and learning practices through participation in professional learning communities.

*In 2016, the NY State Education Department changed the testing experience and manner of the assessments for the ELA exam.

In NYC, 8 out of 10 low-income children can’t read on grade-level. In 2013–14, UWNYC launched ReadNYC, our signature collective impact campaign for grade-level reading, to address this critical issue. Our first target community was Mott Haven in the South Bronx. With our anchor-partner East Side House Settlement and 28 other local organizations, we defined our goals for improving early-childhood literacy in that community. We also launched Once Upon a Summer, a summer reading initiative, and boosted parent engagement through Read and Rise, a bilingual parent-literacy program.
In response to the NYC high school dropout crisis, Graduate, Prepare, Succeed (GPS-NYC) served more than 5,500 students during the school year. This initiative that we developed in partnership with the NYC Department of Education (DOE) and community-d partners helped students improve their attendance by providing academic interventions, attendance services and family outreach.
The Child Care and Early Education Fund supports policy and systems’ change efforts that impact the entire city. It strengthens and provides supports to public systems (governmental services) that serve children ages 0-5 in all five boroughs.
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FeedNYC

FeedNYC works to strengthen the capacity of emergency food providers to distribute healthy, fresh food to underserved neighborhoods across New York City. FeedNYC addresses the nearly 3 million New Yorkers who regularly have trouble affording healthy food and the 1.4 million New Yorkers who don’t know where their next meal will come from.

THE RESULTS

Through our partnership with 400 community-based organizations, our FeedNYC team:

  • Distributed nearly $7 million in food support grants to more than 360 emergency food providers.
  • Served 3.4 million meals across 360 emergency food providers.
  • Distributed nearly 300,000 pounds of fresh, local produce to 48 emergency food providers.
  • Conducted 15 nutrition, hands-on cooking, and food safety workshops.
  • Awarded $30,000 through our Seed Grant for urban farming program, which improves emergency food providers’ access to fresh, healthy foods.
UWNYC’s emergency food grants ensured 379 emergency food program sites received high-quality, wholesome foods that met nutritional standards across fiber, sodium and fat. These program sites reported serving approximately 59 million meals.
Local Produce Link (LPL), a farm-to-food pantry program gets fresh produce to low-income communities. Last year, area farmers delivered 280,868 pounds (75% organic) of harvested produce to 49 participating pantries.
Annually, UWNYC runs 12–15 workshops that train over 250 representatives from emergency food program sites in food protection, pantry management and cooking with fresh produce to improve the health and nutrition status of people needing food assistance.
Operation support funding, including capital equipment, is key to the success of our emergency food program partners. Last year, this funding supplied vital resources such as food service paper and disposable products, transportation, staff cost, utilities and space, as well as staple kitchen equipment, including freezers, refrigerators and stoves.

EducateNYC

EducateNYC is United Way of New York City’s community schools initiative, offering the supports and services needed to remove barriers and help students succeed.

In 2017, more than 20,000 students at 45 Attendance Improvement and Dropout Prevention (AIDP) initiative schools were served. EducateNYC works with the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) and the NYCDOE Office of Community Schools to strengthen school and community-based organization (CBO) partnerships. These partnerships allow EducateNYC to provide increased attention to attendance improvement and implement an array of student and family services.

THE RESULTS

  • UWNYC community partners provided more than 27,000 services—including after school, physical and mental health, art and culture, and youth development—across 45 AIDP schools.
  • Nearly 6,000 students were engaged in Expanded Day Learning—keeping them learning beyond the normal school day to continue their academic success.
  • More than 9,000 students received health and mental health services—ensuring they have the supports needed to advance their education.
  • EducateNYC served more than 20,000 elementary, middle, and high school students and their families during the 2016–2017 academic year.
In partnership with New York State and seven community-d organizations, FSC provides resources for individuals and families to get screened for and enroll in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Last year, FSC distributed over $1.4 million to New Yorkers living in food-insecure households. SNAP has generated more than $276 million in economic activity for New York City’s under-resourced communities.
EFSP supplements the work of pantries, kitchens and shelters assisting New York City residents who are facing economic emergency. In 2013–14, EFSP directly funded 183 agencies that aided 300 emergency food and shelter programs. Of this funding, nearly $800,000 in emergency rent, mortgage and utility assistance helped families and individuals prevent homelessness.
Designed as a unified pilot initiative across four markets in the Tri-State Region, UWNYC launched CollegePath in July 2013 to provide a lifeline to low-to-moderate income (LMI) families to help them afford their child's college education. CollegePath employed a coordinated data-driven strategy that gave LMI families the asset-building and money-management skills needed to meet the financial demands of college educations. CollegePath especially served families enrolled in our GPS-NYC program.
UWNYC awarded the Women’s Center for Education and Career Advancement (WCECA) $75,000 to develop the Self-Sufficiency Standard Report, which examined how much income NYC households of diverse composition and location need to make ends meet. UWNYC sat influentially on the report’s steering committee to drive and shape the analysis and policy recommendations.

BenefitsAccessNYC

BenefitsAccessNYC connects families with critical assistance essential to becoming self-sufficient, including benefits such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), emergency food and shelter, healthcare assistance, transportation support, financial empowerment, and job-readiness opportunities to help New Yorkers move from surviving to thriving.

THE RESULTS

Through partnerships with nine community organizations, our BenefitsAccessNYC team:

  • Provided outreach to nearly 62,000 households to inform them of benefits to which they may be entitled*.
  • Filed more than 16,000 applications and enrolled nearly 11,000 households in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)*.
  • Referred more than 13,000 households in a range of public benefits*.
  • Supported more than 20 agencies, providing financial assistance to families and helped more than 2,500 NYC families, receive emergency cash assistance to prevent eviction and loss of essential utility services**.

*Numbers for UWNYC’s Food Support Connections Program reflect the budget year of October 1, 2016–September 30, 2017.
**Numbers reflect UWNYC’s Emergency Food and Shelter Program Phase 33 running February 1, 2017–January 31, 2018, and Phase 34 that began October 1, 2017 and ends January 31, 2018.

Through placement support, customized coaching sessions and training workshops, UWNYC placed 78 new boards members onto 58 nonprofit boards, strengthened board governance practices for 92 boards and 247 board members, and educated 193 potential board candidates. These efforts impacted the organizational infrastructure of 133 NYC nonprofits.
As an active member of the Change Capital Fund collaborative, UWNYC’s $75,000 contribution assisted five community development organizations upgrade their strategies and develop new business models to address persistent poverty more effectively. Additional Technical Assistance helped each initiative identify the tracking systems they would need to better understand and demonstrate their results.

BoardServeNYC

BoardServeNYC connects nonprofit partners with talented and committed individuals who are eager to share their skills and expertise as board members. BoardServeNYC helps volunteers strengthen their leadership skills, impact positive change in high-need communities, and expand both their professional and personal networks.

THE RESULTS

  • 139 people were accepted into the BoardServeNYC program
  • 117 BoardServeNYC candidates received training
  • 49 board members, including executive directors, received customized coaching
  • 19 newly trained board members were placed
  • 21 nonprofit boards trained in good governance
Our work pyramid